Fall Foodie Classes in Shanghai 2019

Cooking classes in Shanghai

We all appreciate how important it is to be able to cook (or have a partner / friend who can cook!) in order to have a healthy diet.  If you enjoy cooking but are lacking healthy recipe ideas or cooking skills, please consider coming to my new class series being offered at CieCAS cooking school. CieCAS is a beautiful new cooking school that is set up to give professional and non-professional classes.

I am partnering with CieCAS to offer classes which include; How to Eat a Balanced Diet, Good Food, Good Mood, Taste is the Key for a Successful Diet (class about spices), The Importance of Healthy Fats, and Healthy Meals for Toddlers. The classes will be a mix of nutrition advice, cooking your own healthy meals, and fun! There will even be wine. J  Add me on WeChat (search Jess_Detroit or 13795400864) to get more information or scan the QR code on the flyer below. If these classes don’t work for you, there always seems to be someone in Shanghai providing interesting cooking classes such as Shiyin (swangyin), Expatcucina (official account), and Nutri Cooking (Nurit_Segev).

Classes start on 16th Oct 2019.

We will be using seasonal produce that is either organic or meets all EU safety standards. The products are regularly tested by the company who will be providing them for the classes (Goma Greens).   Hope to see you there!

Here is a brief intro to some of the foods we will use:

Peppers

Peppers are rich in vitamin C and antioxidants. The vitamin C in peppers helps to increase iron absorption so include them in iron rich meals. Vitamin C also protects against infection by stimulating the formation of antibodies and boosting immunity. Capsanthin is just one of a few powerful antioxidants found in peppers which give red peppers their color.

Pumpkin and Sweet Potato

Pumpkin and sweet potato are full of fiber and vitamin A.  Vitamin A helps regulate the immune system and protects from infections by keeping skin and tissues in the mouth, stomach, intestines and respiratory system healthy. Increasing fiber helps prevent constipation and controls blood sugar.

Cruciferous Vegetables- Cauliflower, Broccoli, and Brussels Sprouts etc.

Cruciferous vegetables are known for their anti-inflammatory and cancer fighting phytonutrients, and most are rich in minerals such as folate. Folate helps prevents birth defects and may influence immune response. These high fiber low calorie vegetables make for a combination that will keep you feeling full and satisfied.

Whole Grains- Barley, Oats, Buckwheat, Bulgur, Brown Rice, and Whole-Grain Pastas etc.

Whole grains are rich in B vitamins and minerals (iron, copper, zinc, magnesium). Vitamin B impacts our energy levels and promotes cell health. Refining grains strips away half the B vitamins plus many nutrients that cannot be replaced through fortification. Magnesium is needed for more than 300 biochemical reactions in the body and also aids in the production of energy.

 

Until the next time – maybe at the classes! – Jessica W.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eat Well for Winter

I associate holidays and other times of the year with delicious in-season produce that I am excited to see on my plate.  In the US, I look forward to the spring asparagus, summer cherries, and autumn squash varieties.  Eating seasonal produce provides us with the freshest and healthiest foods to protect our bodies during the cold and flu season.  Eating seasonal vegetables and fruits is also environmentally friendly as it reduces the miles from farm to table.  Lastly, it helps to support local providers like Rosa Grange Farm in my previous blog post.

Colorful fruits and vegetables
Colorful fruits and vegetables

Eating local produce will ensure that a variety of nutrient-dense, colorful foods ends up on our meal plate. The yellow, orange, red, white and deep green colors of fall and winter can provide the nutrition needed to avoid racking up the sick days.  We all know  people who swear by tonics or supplements that act as a cure-all remedy.  A magic potion would be amazing, but society has yet to invent one (if you find it, please let me know!).  While there are many factors at work and many approaches to get through flu season unscathed, eating well and sleeping well, together with exercise and stress reduction will always help.

While we may be familiar with what’s seasonal at home, what about seasonal produce here in Shanghai?  Look for these foods at the market or in your online store to help keep your defenses up against cold or flu during the coming months.  Add a variety, to ensure you are getting the required vitamins A, C & E, folate (folic acid) and antioxidants.

Fall

Fall Fruits: Grapes, Apples, Pomegranates, Dates, Pears, Guava.

Fall Vegetables: Potato, Okra, Taro, Chinese yam, Winter Melon, Indian bean, Snap Peas.

Fall Nuts / Spices: Chestnuts, Almonds, Ginger.

Winter

Winter Fruits: Grapefruit, Pumpkins, Passion fruit, Tangerines.

Winter Vegetables: Bok Choy, Yams, Cabbage, Carrots, Mushrooms, Leeks, Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Turnips, Radish, Soybean, Chinese Pumpkin, Butternut Squash.

Winter Nuts/Spices: garlic, chestnuts.

All Seasons

All Varieties: Avocados, Lemons, Oranges, Cabbage, Lettuce (all leafy greens), Bananas, Celery, Cherry Tomatoes, Papayas, Parsnips, Rutabaga, Dragon Fruit, Bitter Melon, Daikon.

Be adventurous, expand your boundaries in the fruit and veg store……and Eat Well Shanghai! 😉

Jessica W.

Rules of the Road for Eating Well in Shanghai


3-IMG_1482As mentioned by Margaret in her previous post, I am new to Shanghai. My perspective is just that, someone new to an area trying to understand the lay of the land and how to function in a new environment. This includes how to eat healthily. Unfortunately, there is more to healthy eating than just consuming fruits and vegetables. If only it were that easy. There are a few simple rules I live by.

  1. Make healthy eating a priority.
    • Make a plan for eating well for the week. Schedule time for shopping and preparing meals at home.
  2. Eat lots of fruits, vegetables and whole grains.
  3. Minimize processed foods (pre-made, pre-packaged etc.).
  4. Make your own meals and limit use of take-out.

They seem simple enough, but sometimes the execution is far more difficult than the plan. There are additional challenges to healthy and safe eating when living in Shanghai.  I have been asked by many people who are new to the city, “How do I avoid all the sugar and oil?” People often say it is difficult to get back on track with the healthy eating habits they had in their home country. I certainly feel their pain. Perhaps something can be learned from my trial and error as a newbie.  In my time here, I have created a few extra rules for eating well in Shanghai.

  1. Don’t go Sherpa crazy.
    • A busy expat lifestyle combined with lack of local knowledge makes a nightly call to Sherpa a very attractive option. When you allow others to prepare your food, you lose control of quality of ingredients, portion sizes, oil quantities etc.
  2. Map out where and when to get groceries.
    • It’s likely that, unlike at home, you will not meet all your grocery needs in 1 shop. Do your research, identify the best places for your healthy and safe food requirements and make time to go shopping.  There are also some great online resources for food shopping in Shanghai.  Do what is right for you, what is right for your schedule.
  3. Use local fruits and vegetables.
    • Make use of the wide array of produce including lotus roots, bitter melons, and oyster mushrooms etc. that are freely available in your local store.

The number one reason I am given for not eating healthily is a lack of time. But who has tons of time? So much time they cannot fathom what to do?  No one in Shanghai yet! However, healthy eating should be a priority because it is so important. Achieving and doing everything else in life is that much easier when you feel energized and healthy. Understandably, starting a new routine can be extremely difficult. I had an entire lunch of Pocky Sticks one day (OK, maybe two days!).  I had no routine at the time. I have since made it my mission to make simple, inexpensive and quick meals that include local vegetables and fruits. In my future posts I will share my cooking and Shanghai food related adventures.

In the meantime – Eat Well Shanghai! –

Jessica W.